Bronxville Celebrates Mexican Culture On Cinco De Mayo

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Sarah Moore, second from left, poses with her co-workers after going to Happy Hour in Bronxville to celebrate Cinco de Mayo.
Sarah Moore, second from left, poses with her co-workers after going to Happy Hour in Bronxville to celebrate Cinco de Mayo. Photo Credit: Zak Failla

NEW ROCHELLE, N.Y. – If the saying is true that “everybody is a little Irish on St. Patrick’s Day,” Sound Shore residents were a little Mexican on Monday as they celebrated Cinco de Mayo.

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Do You Celebrate Cinco de Mayo?

  • Yes! Bring on the tequila and tacos.

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Cinco de Mayo is the annual celebration of the Mexican Army’s surprising victory over the French in the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862. Each year in Mexico, there is an annual parade to honor the soldiers that fought off the French.

More than 150 years later, Americans north of the border kicked off Cinco de Mayo celebrations over the weekend, with various festivals, Mexican music, ethnic delicacies and tequila drink specials for all.

In Bronxville, the Blue Moon Mexican Café has had drink specials all weekend, and employed a mariachi band for patrons on Monday afternoon.

“It’s an excuse to drink margaritas, have a few extra shots of Patron and feast on tacos,” Eastchester resident Bill Rivera, 30, said. “We drink Guinness for St. Patrick’s Day and Coronas for Cinco de Mayo.”

In Bronxville, Sarah Moore, 27, and a group of co-workers said they ducked out of the office a little early to enjoy a premature Happy Hour.

“There aren’t a lot of silly holidays that you get to do something like this, so I think it’ll be alright,” she said. “I’m not a big tequila girl, but I love me a margarita.”

While waiting for an order of chips, guacamole and tostadas at Mr. Taco in New Rochelle, Al Quinones, whose family immigrated north from Mexico years before he was born, said that Cinco de Mayo used to be a larger celebration for him and his family.

“I remember my mom used to cook up the chicken, mole, tamales, everything. The kitchen would smell like chilies for days,” he recalled. “Our family has spread apart as we’ve grown older, but it’s good to have a day to celebrate the culture.”

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